Nearly half of all Americans think the national media makes up stories about Trump

One more sign that the public’s trust in national media has eroded to a startling level. A revealing poll by POLITICO/Morning Consult shows considerable distrust of the national media. Overall, 46% believe the media fabricates news stories about President Trump and his administration. Only 37% say the media doesn’t make up stories while 17% are … Continue reading Nearly half of all Americans think the national media makes up stories about Trump

TV still #1 choice for news consumption, but the gap is narrowing

Only a third trust social media as a news source Half of all Americans report they get their news on television, but the gap with online is narrowing. 43% now say they often get their news online. The gap is just 1 points, narrowing from 19 points in 2015, according to a new survey from Pew … Continue reading TV still #1 choice for news consumption, but the gap is narrowing

One of the creators of Google News calls the search site “shameful and irresponsible” in spreading fake news

Google's already under fire for its role in spreading "Fake News."  Now, one of the engineers who helped create Google News had quite a bit to say about the search site and it wasn’t flattering.  Krishna Bharat helped lead the team the creation team, but posted to Facebook that Google News has become “shameful and … Continue reading One of the creators of Google News calls the search site “shameful and irresponsible” in spreading fake news

Partisan views on media are more entrenched than ever

If anything, partisan views of the national news media have gotten even more entrenched… and the gap has widened, according to a national survey by Pew Research Center. While Democrat views on the impact of the national news media have grown more positive, Republicans have grown even more negative in their assessment of the media. There’s … Continue reading Partisan views on media are more entrenched than ever

Where did people turn for life-saving information in Hurricane Harvey? Local TV stations

If you doubted that local television is still important in people’s lives, consider this:  When Hurricane Harvey was threatening Texas, where did people turn for the latest information?  Local TV. 89% surveyed said local TV news was their top choice.  Their second choice?  Local TV station websites.  Their third choice?  National TV News. Study Results … Continue reading Where did people turn for life-saving information in Hurricane Harvey? Local TV stations

We’ve got work to do: Majority of public thinks media is biased

Media folks, we’ve got a lot of work to do.  The general public now believe overwhelmingly that news organizations are biases and subject to partisan agendas. We used to joke in newsrooms that if we had both Democrats and Republicans calling to complain about our story, we were probably OK, but if only one side … Continue reading We’ve got work to do: Majority of public thinks media is biased

Great read: Digital Vault highlights the intersection of Digital + Media + Marketing

Blatant-plug-alert!  I'm the publisher and editor of another website, Digital Vault, which I'd love for you to check out. The site focus on the intersection of digital, media, and marketing.  We now have more than 100 advertising, marketing, and digital evangelists writing and contributing to the site and the growth has been nothing short of … Continue reading Great read: Digital Vault highlights the intersection of Digital + Media + Marketing

The difference between NATIONAL news reporting and LOCAL News reporting? Trust.

With all the talk about fake news and how much the public doesn’t believe journalists, it’s important to note that there’s a huge difference in how people view NATIONAL news media versus LOCAL news media.  The local folks live and work in your community, go to church there, shop at stores, pay local taxes and … Continue reading The difference between NATIONAL news reporting and LOCAL News reporting? Trust.

The Illusory Truth Effect: The more someone sees “fake news,” the more they believe it

A study done by Yale University’s Department of Psychology, Department of Economics, and School of Management concluded that “even a single exposure (to fake news) increases perceptions of accuracy.” Here’s the kicker: Even when flagged as disputed by fact-checkers, or warned that the story might be fake, the perception of accuracy went up. “Increased perceptions … Continue reading The Illusory Truth Effect: The more someone sees “fake news,” the more they believe it

Overall news consumption is up 18%

Overwhelming majority of consumption happens on TV Adults in the US spend more than 72.5 BILLION MINUTES consuming news during an average week.  The Nielsen folks say total new consumption across platforms was up 18% last year.  Broadcast TV (local and national) accounted for the biggest chunk of viewing (29.4 billion) followed by cable news … Continue reading Overall news consumption is up 18%

Three challenges for the web, according to its inventor

Al Gore jokes aside, the man credited with creating the WWW in web addresses says we’ve got some big problems on-line that need to be addressed. He’s published a letter to the world, titled “Three challenges for the web, according to its inventor.” In the letter, Tim Berners-Lee, talks about three specific things that need … Continue reading Three challenges for the web, according to its inventor

Even people that get their news from Facebook don’t believe it

A majority of adults say they see news on Facebook, but they don’t trust it.  That’s the topline from an Ipsos Public Affairs survey for BuzzFeed News. Broadcast TV news (as opposed to cable news) was the top place US consumers saw news at 56%, but Facebook was right alongside at 55%.  But when the … Continue reading Even people that get their news from Facebook don’t believe it

Can students tell the difference between fake news and real news?

This fake news thing is bigger than just election results.  “Fake news” has become a label people freely put on facts they don’t agree with.  People will call something “fake news” when in fact it’s true.  They just disagree.  But call something by a label enough and it often sticks.  Source:  this past election. But … Continue reading Can students tell the difference between fake news and real news?

Has Facebook hired someone to fix its “fake news” problem? Uh, no.

There was a short window of excitement when a TV newsie announced she was hired to lead Facebook's News Partnerships team. Campbell Brown, former NBC News anchor and White House correspondent, and prime-time CNN news anchor, announced - on Facebook - that she's taking on a new role at the social media platform to  “help … Continue reading Has Facebook hired someone to fix its “fake news” problem? Uh, no.

Media, Pollsters get failing grades

There’s no question it was a nasty election season.  The losers?  According to a poll by the Pew Research Center, just about everyone. The press got blasted… even more than the candidates themselves. When voters were asked to grade how different people/groups conducted themselves in the campaign, Donald Trump got a D or F grade … Continue reading Media, Pollsters get failing grades

President-Elect Trump slips the press pool twice; media goes crazy

Media folks fight with each other every day.  They’ll do all sorts of things to beat their competition.  So, when 18 media organizations get together to unite on a common goal, it might make you wonder what they’re all worried about. It appears they are worried about President-elect Donald Trump’s relationship with the media.  They’ve … Continue reading President-Elect Trump slips the press pool twice; media goes crazy

Define your Weapon of Mass Distinction: Avoiding “We do it too” advertising

Advertising lessons learned from working in the news business For several years, I worked as a strategic consultant and trainer at some of America’s top television stations, including those owned by Gannett Broadcasting, Hearst-Argyle, Post-Newsweek, Cox, Raycom Media, Journal Broadcasting, Freedom, and Fox. I have worked on projects for Entertainment Tonight, Hard Copy and Real … Continue reading Define your Weapon of Mass Distinction: Avoiding “We do it too” advertising

How to make sure your news stays in fans FB feeds

The news that Facebook is tweaking the algorithm to give higher priority to friends posts and pictures and de-emphasizing news publishers will change the amount of referral traffic to news websites. Facebook told publishers to expect a decrease.  This is on top of the 42% decrease reported last month at major publishing sites from the … Continue reading How to make sure your news stays in fans FB feeds

Should the news you see be chosen by Journalists or by its Popularity?

No doubt you’ve seen the commotion about how Facebook picks stories for its Trending section after several former workers said they were told not to feature certain news sites.  Makes for an interesting headline about Facebook suppressing conservative news blogs, but I had a different reaction. First, it’s Facebook. It’s not a news website.  It’s … Continue reading Should the news you see be chosen by Journalists or by its Popularity?

Why aren’t publishers paying more attention to email newsletters?

A Nielsen study funded by the Knight Foundation specifically looked at the pathway to news.  In other words, what were people doing right before going to a news-related app or mobile site? As expected, the majority of traffic comes from Facebook with Google Search generally come in second.  Often overlooked, however, are email newsletters, which drives … Continue reading Why aren’t publishers paying more attention to email newsletters?

Will people still read long-form news on tiny cell phone screens?

With more and more traffic going to mobile, specifically smart phones, every day, is there a future for long form journalism on line? That’s one of the questions a recent Pew Research Center study tried to answer. Researchers looked at 125 million cellphone sessions accessing 74,840 articles encompassing 30 news websites over a six-month period. … Continue reading Will people still read long-form news on tiny cell phone screens?